Hound Lou’s record-breaking ears are among entries in latest Guinness World Records book


A dog with the longest ears, a girl with the biggest feet and a man who can walk on his hands faster than anyone else have made it into this year’s Guinness World Records.

The 2022 edition of the annual publication is released on Thursday and features a host of new record-breakers from around the world.

Lou the black and tan coonhound, from Portland, Oregon, is the new holder of the record for ‘longest ears on a dog (living)’. Each measures 13.38 inches. 

Morgan Parsley now holds the record for having the world’s largest feet for a teenager. 

They measure up at 12.2inches (30.9cm) long – meaning she wears size 11.5 shoes.

Zion Clark, from Ohio, made it into this year’s book after he completed the fastest 20m (66feet) on two hands, in 4.78 seconds.

Clark was born with Caudal Regression Syndrome, meaning he was born with no legs and his perseverance saw him introduced to wrestling in elementary school.

Also included in this year’s book is Pratik Mohite from Maharashtra, India, who became the shortest competitive bodybuilder (male), standing at 3ft 4in (102cm).

Mohite began bodybuilding after seeing the sport as a representation of being fit and strong, wanting to take part even if others saw him as ‘weak’.

Lou the black and tan coonhound, from Portland, Oregon, is the new holder of the record for 'longest ears on a dog (living)'. Each measures 13.38 inches

Lou the black and tan coonhound, from Portland, Oregon, is the new holder of the record for ‘longest ears on a dog (living)’. Each measures 13.38 inches

Morgan Parsley now holds the record for having the world's largest feet for a teenager. They measure up at 12.2inches (30.9cm) long – meaning she wears size 11.5 shoes

Morgan Parsley now holds the record for having the world's largest feet for a teenager. They measure up at 12.2inches (30.9cm) long – meaning she wears size 11.5 shoes

Morgan Parsley now holds the record for having the world’s largest feet for a teenager. They measure up at 12.2inches (30.9cm) long – meaning she wears size 11.5 shoes

Coonhound Lou’s owner Paige Olsen, 29, a veterinary technician, had always joked that her 80lb dog’s ears were ‘extravagantly long’, but it was only while staying at home during the pandemic that she decided to measure them.

Yesterday she said: ‘Lou might think she’s special – but I think she’s thought that from the beginning. I think she’s always known she’s a little bit better than the rest of us.

‘Now people can’t wait to get her paw-digraph! I’m very proud of the furry little munchkin for being so special.’

Tigger, a bloodhound from Illinois who died in 2009, still holds the record for longest ears ever. One was 13.75 inches, the other 13.5 inches.

Zion Clark, from Ohio, made it into this year's book after he completed the fastest 20m (66feet) on two hands, in 4.78 seconds

Zion Clark, from Ohio, made it into this year's book after he completed the fastest 20m (66feet) on two hands, in 4.78 seconds

Zion Clark, from Ohio, made it into this year’s book after he completed the fastest 20m (66feet) on two hands, in 4.78 seconds

Clark was born with Caudal Regression Syndrome, meaning he was born with no legs and his perseverance saw him introduced to wrestling in elementary school

Clark was born with Caudal Regression Syndrome, meaning he was born with no legs and his perseverance saw him introduced to wrestling in elementary school

Clark was born with Caudal Regression Syndrome, meaning he was born with no legs and his perseverance saw him introduced to wrestling in elementary school

Also included in this year's book is Pratik Mohite from Maharashtra, India, who became the shortest competitive bodybuilder (male), standing at 3ft 4in (102cm)

Also included in this year's book is Pratik Mohite from Maharashtra, India, who became the shortest competitive bodybuilder (male), standing at 3ft 4in (102cm)

Mohite began bodybuilding after seeing the sport as a representation of being fit and strong, wanting to take part even if others saw him as 'weak'

Mohite began bodybuilding after seeing the sport as a representation of being fit and strong, wanting to take part even if others saw him as 'weak'

Also included in this year’s book is Pratik Mohite from Maharashtra, India, who became the shortest competitive bodybuilder (male), standing at 3ft 4in (102cm). Mohite began bodybuilding after seeing the sport as a representation of being fit and strong, wanting to take part even if others saw him as ‘weak’

Other animals to make it into the book include Lollipop the deaf Boston Terrier, aged three and Sashimi the five-year-old Bengal Leopard cat, who teamed up to set a new world record for the ‘fastest 5 metres on a scooter by a dog and cat (pair)’ after achieving the feat in 4.37 seconds.

Both were rescued by Melissa Millet, a professional movie and stunt animal trainer from Ontario, Canada, after being abandoned by their previous owners.

Ms Millett said both enjoyed solo scootering then one day, to her surprise, came up with their double act trick on their own – when Lollipop hopped on the back while Sashimi was practising.

Another of Ms Millet’s rescues, Jellybean, a deaf three-year-old Australian Cattle Dog, features in the book for the ‘fastest pushing a basketball by a dog’ (10.31 seconds) and the ‘most bounce passes of basketball between a human an dog in 30 seconds’ (21).

Coonhound Lou's owner Paige Olsen, 29, a veterinary technician, had always joked that her 80lb dog's ears were 'extravagantly long', but it was only while staying at home during the pandemic that she decided to measure them

Coonhound Lou's owner Paige Olsen, 29, a veterinary technician, had always joked that her 80lb dog's ears were 'extravagantly long', but it was only while staying at home during the pandemic that she decided to measure them

Coonhound Lou’s owner Paige Olsen, 29, a veterinary technician, had always joked that her 80lb dog’s ears were ‘extravagantly long’, but it was only while staying at home during the pandemic that she decided to measure them

Other animals to make it into the book include Lollipop the deaf Boston Terrier, aged three and Sashimi the five-year-old Bengal Leopard cat, who teamed up to set a new world record for the 'fastest 5 metres on a scooter by a dog and cat (pair)' after achieving the feat in 4.37 seconds

Other animals to make it into the book include Lollipop the deaf Boston Terrier, aged three and Sashimi the five-year-old Bengal Leopard cat, who teamed up to set a new world record for the 'fastest 5 metres on a scooter by a dog and cat (pair)' after achieving the feat in 4.37 seconds

Other animals to make it into the book include Lollipop the deaf Boston Terrier, aged three and Sashimi the five-year-old Bengal Leopard cat, who teamed up to set a new world record for the ‘fastest 5 metres on a scooter by a dog and cat (pair)’ after achieving the feat in 4.37 seconds

Both were rescued by Melissa Millet, a professional movie and stunt animal trainer from Ontario, Canada, after being abandoned by their previous owners. Another of Ms Millet's rescues, Jellybean, a deaf three-year-old Australian Cattle Dog, features in the book for the 'fastest pushing a basketball by a dog' (10.31 seconds) and the 'most bounce passes of basketball between a human an dog in 30 seconds' (21)

Both were rescued by Melissa Millet, a professional movie and stunt animal trainer from Ontario, Canada, after being abandoned by their previous owners. Another of Ms Millet's rescues, Jellybean, a deaf three-year-old Australian Cattle Dog, features in the book for the 'fastest pushing a basketball by a dog' (10.31 seconds) and the 'most bounce passes of basketball between a human an dog in 30 seconds' (21)

Both were rescued by Melissa Millet, a professional movie and stunt animal trainer from Ontario, Canada, after being abandoned by their previous owners. Another of Ms Millet’s rescues, Jellybean, a deaf three-year-old Australian Cattle Dog, features in the book for the ‘fastest pushing a basketball by a dog’ (10.31 seconds) and the ‘most bounce passes of basketball between a human an dog in 30 seconds’ (21)

Hand-walker Mr Clark, 23, is hoping to become the first American athlete to compete in both an Olympic (wrestling) and Paralympic (wheelchair racing) Games in 2024.

Mr Mohite began bodybuilding after seeing the sport as a representation of being fit and strong, wanting to take part even if others saw him as ‘weak’

Another of the record-breakers is Laetitia Ky, from Abidjan in Ivory Coast, who holds the record for the most skips over a person’s own hair in 30 seconds.

She achieved 60 skips by braiding her natural hair and adding extensions to sculpt her skipping ‘rope’.

Another of the record-breakers is Laetitia Ky, from Abidjan in Ivory Coast, who holds the record for the most skips over a person's own hair in 30 seconds

Another of the record-breakers is Laetitia Ky, from Abidjan in Ivory Coast, who holds the record for the most skips over a person's own hair in 30 seconds

Another of the record-breakers is Laetitia Ky, from Abidjan in Ivory Coast, who holds the record for the most skips over a person’s own hair in 30 seconds

The 25-year-old is known for creating sculptures with her hair, citing inspiration from the different pre-colonial hairstyles of women from her African culture, and is also a model, actress and content creator.

Gymnast Bethany Lodge became the record-holder for the fastest 100m forward rolls (42.64 seconds) and for the most backwards somersault burpees in 30 seconds (five).

Achieving the records served as a fitness goal for the 28-year-old after she initially found it difficult staying motivated during the coronavirus pandemic, with many training places closed.

The book also has chapters including environmental champions, pop culture icons and sporting heroes.



Source link

Spread the love

Leave a Reply